Invest in architecture!
6 Investors $150 Funds raised
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WHO WE ARE Adjustments Agency is something like a creative agency or a freelance contractor for conceptual remodels. We believe that architecture approaches irrelevancy by sticking to outdated economic models (ie. patronage) and outdated normative orientations (ie. construction). Our current research locates the ‘exhibition’ as an underexplored site for the practice of architecture and the realization of architectural projects. Adjustments Agency believes an exhibit can own itself, architecture can produce itself, and the relationships between a place and its greater context – socioeconomic, ecological, political, etc. – can be designed.
WHAT WE'RE DOING HOMESHOW is an exhibition project that investigates the position of architecture in relation to evolving notions of domesticity and labor within a context marked by the confluence of ecological enmeshment, globalized economies and information networks, as well as persistent patriarchal and racist structures. It focuses on architecture and design practices that locate the interaction of architecture with its others – those external forces that produce a place and determine how we use it – as a site of design. HOMESHOW serves as an envelope for a series of discrete, architectural projects in an existing structure, where ‘curation’ is deployed to link these works, both conceptually and literally, through the organization of flows of energy and information. Located in an existing space in Los Angeles, the project will temporarily modify the relationship between the site and its expanded context. We’re trying to take seriously the idea of designing the economy of the project through components like revenue-generating programming (ie. coworking hours, AirBnB); a retail space for designed objects; innovative relationships to institutional and/or corporate sponsorship; and, most importantly, a crowd-equity model (click on the spinning coin for more information/to invest in the project). The project will also serve as a space for more traditional programming, such as talks and panels, as well as include an integral virtual component. Our collaborators are: Andreas Angelidakis, Christine Bjerke, FOAM, GRNASFCK, Grupo TOMA, and New Territories/M4
Don't want to become an investor? You can still donate!
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HOW IT WORKS Rather than rely on a donation-based model to raise funds, which mirrors the patronage model of architecture, we’re developing a new platform that allows interested parties to become equity shareholders in our projects. One “modifier” (or “mod”) – a digital asset built on top of the Bitcoin blockchain – equals one share in Adjustments Agency and costs $10 during the crowdsale period. You can purchase some here and we'll send you instructions on how to secure your mod via a cryptocurrency wallet (don't worry, it's easy). Later on, you can redeem tokens for goods and services in our exhibits, or receive dividends from any profits earned.* Certain decisions we make will be put up to a vote, and the amount of shares you have equals the weight of your vote. If you’re interested in supporting our project without becoming a shareholder, you can still donate – just use the button below! *This is an art project, not an actual business venture, so we can’t guarantee returns––but we’ll try.
WHY Architecture exhibitions tend to appropriate their model from the art world, favoring representations of built or speculative practices. But unlike art, architecture has no choice but to be site-specific: it is its context. If architecture is a spatial practice and exhibitions typically occur in the three-dimensional world – why shouldn’t a work of architecture work in these spaces? We believe an exhibition of architecture is architecture (or at least can be). More importantly, within a model borrowed from a different market, architects have little to gain from exhibiting their work. Their speculations will remain unrealized and their pockets remain empty. There are few collectors of architectural representations in the world, and little incentive to invest in practice with no chance of return. Architects aren’t artists, and their work doesn’t accrue value in the same way. Social capital, if generated at all, tends to be disproportionately allocated to curators and hosting institutions. And these curators, infected by the art world’s desire for an ecclesiastical purity, attempt to immunize themselves from the "dirtiness" of the economy in order to construct some "pure space" for conceptual revelation (while cashing checks from CitiBank). Architecture can never be isolated from the economy. Space and capital are linked, now more than ever. In short, the architecture exhibition as it exists today is outmoded, just as architecture’s reliance on a patronage model for funding leaves the field increasingly irrelevant. Architecture can only regain agency through redesigning its relationship to the economies in which it is embedded. We believe the exhibition can serve a crucial role in presenting and advocating architectural ideas to a greater public and hopefully help architects fund, manage, and realize their own projects.
Invest in architecture!
6 Investors $150 Funds raised
WHAT WE'RE DOING HOMESHOW is an exhibition project that investigates the position of architecture in relation to evolving notions of domesticity and labor within a context marked by the confluence of ecological enmeshment, globalized economies and information networks, as well as persistent patriarchal and racist structures. It focuses on architecture and design practices that locate the interaction of architecture with its others – those external forces that produce a place and determine how we use it – as a site of design. HOMESHOW serves as an envelope for a series of discrete, architectural projects in an existing structure, where ‘curation’ is deployed to link these works, both conceptually and literally, through the organization of flows of energy and information. Located in an existing space in Los Angeles, the project will temporarily modify the relationship between the site and its expanded context. We’re trying to take seriously the idea of designing the economy of the project through components like revenue-generating programming (ie. coworking hours, AirBnB); a retail space for designed objects; innovative relationships to institutional and/or corporate sponsorship; and, most importantly, a crowd-equity model (click on the spinning coin for more information/to invest in the project). The project will also serve as a space for more traditional programming, such as talks and panels, as well as include an integral virtual component. Our collaborators are: Andreas Angelidakis, Christine Bjerke, FOAM, GRNASFCK, Grupo TOMA, and New Territories/M4
WHY Architecture exhibitions tend to appropriate their model from the art world, favoring representations of built or speculative practices. But unlike art, architecture has no choice but to be site-specific: it is its context. If architecture is a spatial practice and exhibitions typically occur in the three-dimensional world – why shouldn’t a work of architecture work in these spaces? We believe an exhibition of architecture is architecture (or at least can be). More importantly, within a model borrowed from a different market, architects have little to gain from exhibiting their work. Their speculations will remain unrealized and their pockets remain empty. There are few collectors of architectural representations in the world, and little incentive to invest in practice with no chance of return. Architects aren’t artists, and their work doesn’t accrue value in the same way. Social capital, if generated at all, tends to be disproportionately allocated to curators and hosting institutions. And these curators, infected by the art world’s desire for an ecclesiastical purity, attempt to immunize themselves from the "dirtiness" of the economy in order to construct some "pure space" for conceptual revelation (while cashing checks from CitiBank). Architecture can never be isolated from the economy. Space and capital are linked, now more than ever. In short, the architecture exhibition as it exists today is outmoded, just as architecture’s reliance on a patronage model for funding leaves the field increasingly irrelevant. Architecture can only regain agency through redesigning its relationship to the economies in which it is embedded. We believe the exhibition can serve a crucial role in presenting and advocating architectural ideas to a greater public and hopefully help architects fund, manage, and realize their own projects.
HOW IT WORKS Rather than rely on a donation-based model to raise funds, which mirrors the patronage model of architecture, we’re developing a new platform that allows interested parties to become equity shareholders in our projects. One “modifier” (or “mod”) – a digital asset built on top of the Bitcoin blockchain – equals one share in Adjustments Agency and costs $10 during the crowdsale period. You can purchase some here and we'll send you instructions on how to secure your mod via a cryptocurrency wallet (don't worry, it's easy). Later on, you can redeem tokens for goods and services in our exhibits, or receive dividends from any profits earned.* Certain decisions we make will be put up to a vote, and the amount of shares you have equals the weight of your vote. If you’re interested in supporting our project without becoming a shareholder, you can still donate – just use the button below! *This is an art project, not an actual business venture, so we can’t guarantee returns––but we’ll try.
WHO WE ARE Adjustments Agency is something like a creative agency or a freelance contractor for conceptual remodels. We believe that architecture approaches irrelevancy by sticking to outdated economic models (ie. patronage) and outdated normative orientations (ie. construction). Our current research locates the ‘exhibition’ as an underexplored site for the practice of architecture and the realization of architectural projects. Adjustments Agency believes an exhibit can own itself, architecture can produce itself, and the relationships between a place and its greater context – socioeconomic, ecological, political, etc. – can be designed.
Don't want to become an investor? You can still donate!